PUSH THROUGH FOR CHANGE

Second Chance Center is not only a resource for the formerly incarcerated, we are committed to systematic prison reform and advocacy. Colorado Criminal Justice Reform Coalition has been the driver of Colorado's most impactful reform legislation. We are proud of our involvement with CCJRC and always honored to be allowed to play any small part in helping them move the needle in the right direction We will continue to champion criminal justice reform and the rights of those affected as part of our goal to reverse the negative impact of incarceration on communities. Check back for updates on how we are actively working to reverse the negative impact of incarceration on communities.

In June of 2016 we were able to push through Senate Bill 16-180, a bill that addresses persons receiving extremely long sentences for crimes committed as juveniles. It enables them to “Step Down” in custody levels, after serving 10 years, and become eligible for programming leading to community corrections.

SENATE BILL
16-180

In June of 2016 we were able to push through Senate Bill 16-181, a bill that addresses the unconstitutional life sentences given capital crimes committed by juveniles.

 

It enables them to apply for parole consideration after 20 years.

There are 48 inmates in Colorado who fall into this category, most of who have exceeded twenty years in time served.

SENATE BILL
16-181

In August of 2018 we were able to push through House Bill 18-1176, a bill that automatically shifts annual unspent Community Corrections budget dollars to the Colorado Department of Local Affairs.

 

These funds, previously fought over each year, have and will continue to be used to address permanent supportive housing initiatives.

HOUSE BILL
18-1176

In June of 2017 we were able to push through House Bill 17-1326, a bill that funds two Colorado pilot program:

1. Economic Development funding for micro-finance loans to start up or expand community-basedbusinesses.

 

2. Grant funding to CBOs to address 5 Community Priorities determined by a 23-member group of residents forming a Local Planning Team.

HOUSE BILL
17-1326

In April of 2014 we were able to push through House Bill 14-1355, a bill that mandated the Department of Corrections allocate a percentage of its reentry budget to community-based organizations involved in reentry work.

 

It funded the first 4 CBOs to implement the
WAGEES (Work and Gain Education and Employment Skills) program  with SCC being the first. As a result of this bill Medium to High Risk parolees were referred to CBOs for reentry assistance, from the Division of Adult Parole..

HOUSE BILL
14-1355

In May of 2015 we were able to push through Senate Bill 15-124, a bill that will expand the WAGEES program funding to 4 additional CBOs and establish 60 beds in CDOC’s substance abuse treatment program.

 

It will also establish Sure and Swift, a 1-5 day revocation/incarceration or “Wake-up call” for parolees struggling with compliance,
enabling them to be released and continue parole; and reduced revocation times for technical violations.

SENATE BILL
15-124

In April of 2018 we were able to push through House Bill 18-1029, a bill that addresses lowering the period of mandatory parole from five years to three years for certain felony offenses. 

HOUSE BILL
18-1029

In June of 2017 we were able to push through Senate Bill 17-021, a bill that addresses reentry services for persons with mental illness in the criminal justice system.

SENATE BILL
17-021

In May of 2018 we were able to push through Senate Bill 18-016, a bill that seeks to make the transfer of any further unused funds from the Community Corrections budget into adequate mental health and other wrap around service assistance for returning citizens in need a matter of common, practical and prudent policy.

SENATE BILL
18-016

"Together we must challenge individuals, communities, cities, counties, regions, states, and the nation to be accountable for the outcomes of the justice systems at every level of government."

- James Bell